Rachel Worsley

30th May 2017

None of WA’s 10,679 doctors have applied to prescribe medical cannabis since it was legalized in November.

According to the AMA WA, the lack of interest is because doctors do not believe there is evidence to prescribe medical cannabis for anything other than in paediatric epilepsy and MS.

https://www.australiandoctor.com.au/news/latest-news/wa-doctors-shun-medical-cannabis

AMA cautious about medicinal cannabis

But the Australian Medical Association of WA said it remained cautious about the use of medicinal cannabis.

AMA WA president Omar Khorshid said it was important rules around the use of medicinal cannabis remained strict, as its efficacy was still being tested.

"The AMA is certainly not supportive of shortcuts, and instead of avoiding all the regulatory steps, we should be investigating cannabis-based products, how good they are, how safe they are, and once that's been done, they should available just like any other drug," he said.

"The AMA is calling for more research on cannabis-based drugs so that we know what's in them, how well they work, and how safe they are, and once that's done, we'll be able to prescribe to prescribe better drugs for patients to manage these conditions."

Ms Neville said there was international research to show cannabinoid-based products were safe and efficient.

The Department of Health said an application was yet to be received from Ms Neville's doctor, and the department had contacted this doctor to provide information and regulatory assistance.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-07-07/families-struggling-to-access-to-medicinal-cannabis/8685712