Current Issues

15/11/17  By  Professor Neil McKeganey

Last week Scotland’s leading law officer, the Lord Advocate, brought a shuddering halt to a proposal from Glasgow City Council to develop a safe injecting centre in the city. Such a centre would have required a change in UK drug laws to enable individuals in possession of illegal drugs to use those drugs within the centre without fear of prosecution. Supporters of this initiative will be disappointed by the outcome, but they need to recognise that the provision of some level of legal protection covering the possession of illegal drugs within the injecting centre would also, by implication, need to be extended to all of those who might claim, legitimately or otherwise, that their drug possession should be green-lighted because they were en route to the injecting centre. In effect, such an initiative would deliver what many of its supporters actually desire – the legalisation of illegal drugs within at least some part of the UK.

In his judgement, the Lord Advocate has not ruled against setting up a centre where doctors can prescribe opiate drugs to addicts. Rather he has simply pointed out that he is not prepared to offer legal protection to a centre where illegal drugs are being used. The Glasgow proposal sought unwisely to tie the proposal for a doctor-led heroin prescribing clinic, which would be legal, with a setting where individuals are allowed to use illegal drugs which would break UK drug laws. There will be many who rightly question the wisdom (and the cost to the public purse) of linking those two proposals.

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3/11/17

Clenbuterol is a steroid-like chemical that was initially developed to treat asthma in horses, working by relaxing the airways in the animals' lungs

This increase will lead to a variety of effects, such as:

  • rapid fat burning

  • excitability

  • nervousness

  • increased energy

  • greater determination

Why is clenbuterol used?

Clenbuterol's initial use was as an asthma drug. However, bodybuilders, performance athletes, and those wanting to lose weight are now using the drug.

Clenbuterol can be used as a weight-loss aid because it can increase a person's metabolism. As well as reducing body fat and weight, it also allows the user to retain both muscle mass and body strength at the same time.

Clenbuterol became known as a celebrity diet secret because of its apparent use by celebrities and famous athletes.

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José Laganière | VAT News| Published October 25, 2017 

Even though she is now 17, Jessika already knows the serious repercussions that drug and alcohol use can have on a life. She says legalizing marijuana in Canada is a big mistake.

The last few years have not been easy for Jessika. After smoking her first pot joint when she was only 11, she then fell into alcohol and other harder drugs. Powerless, her parents witnessed this drift until a six-month therapy at the Portage Center finally came back on track.

With the forthcoming legalization of marijuana, Jessika and her mother are extremely worried about the harmful effects of this measure. "I saw lots of people scrap, people in psychosis, I saw all the colors and all the people who consumed with me started with pot and then switch to other drugs" , she told TVA News.

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Alex White, EXCLUSIVE, Herald Sun October 28, 2017 

MEDICINAL cannabis is no better than conventional drugs for treating children with severe epilepsy, according to a top Victorian doctor.

After months of treatment, none of the 29 Victorian children accessing $1 million worth of medicinal cannabis product, imported from Canada, has been seizure free.

Paediatric neurologist Professor Ingrid Scheffer told the Sunday Herald Sunmedicinal cannabis had been effective in some of the cases by reducing fits among some of the group.

However, the results had been similar to outcomes achieved on other pharmaceutical drugs and it was not the miracle solution families were hoping for.

Families hear the news kids who need cannabis to help with chronic illness will gain access. Picture: Jason Edwards

“Initially we all had a sense of hope but that didn’t last but that is the nature of these diseases,” Prof Scheffer said.

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  • Cannabis users more likely to commit violent crimes, research has shown 
  • Study found there was a ‘more constant relationship’ between cannabis and violence than between alcohol or cocaine use and violence
  • More than 20 US states have legalised cannabis for medical purposes

By Steve Doughty    PUBLISHED:  5 October 2017 

Cannabis users are more likely to commit violent crime, pioneering research has shown.

It warned those who smoke the drug regularly run an increased risk of using violence against others.

The project is the first to demonstrate that cannabis is not only linked with violent crime but is the cause.

Violent incidents monitored by the study based on the lives of more than 1,100 American psychiatric patients included assaults, attacks with weapons and rapes.

Researchers said that cannabis causes violence and they found no evidence that the link is the other way round – i.e. that violent people are more likely to use cannabis.

There was no support, they added, for theories put forward by campaigners anxious to free the drug from the taint of links with crime. The academics said the effect of cannabis use was clear and not diminished by other factors such as patients who were heavy drinkers of alcohol.

The study comes after a series of American states have decriminalised cannabis – despite it being stronger and more potent than the hash smoked by hippies in the Sixties – or made it available for medical use.

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THE DRUG ADVISORY COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA SUPPORTS

More detoxification & rehabilitation that gets illicit drug users drug free.
Court ordered and supervised detoxification & rehabilitation.
Less illicit drug users, drug pushers and drug related crimes.

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